10 Websites where you can sell your Handmade Items

10 websites where you can sell your handmade items - thesteadyhandblog.com

If you want to sell your handmade crafts online there are many Websites and Marketplaces to choose from. I sell my handmade items on Etsy and my crochet patterns on Ravelry, Craftsy & Meylah. I get the most sales on Etsy with Craftsy coming in 2nd. I have tried different websites to sell my items and at one point I even tried to sell my items on my own website. That didn’t work out well at all. Depending on what type of items you make there is a marketplace out there for you. It will take some time to figure out which one works the best for you.

Here is a list of 10 websites that you can use to sell your Handmade Items. If you have tried them please let us know how they work for you in the comments below. Thanks!

Etsy

1. Etsy - Probably the most used Handmade marketplace. You can also sell supplies and vintage items here. Creating an Etsy shop is FREE. There are no monthly fees. You are charged $0.20 to list an item. A listing lasts for 4 months or until the items is sold. When you sell an item on Etsy you are charged a 3.5% transaction fee. If you select to accept payment via Credit Card (Direct Checkout), Etsy also charges a payment processing fee of 3% + $0.25 USD for each order.

The main reason why I use Etsy is because it is very user-friendly for sellers and buyers. Yes, Etsy is very crowded and you have a lot of competition but the Etsy community is very helpful. Selling on Etsy has made me a better crafter and entrepreneur.

2. Artfire – I have not used ArtFire to sell my items. I have shopped there before. ArtFire Seller Accounts are $12.95/month. You can sign up for a FREE 14 day trial to see how it works before you start paying.

3. Zibbet – I have not used Zibbet to sell my items either. They offer 3 types of Seller Accounts.

A FREE plan has no listing fees or commission/sale fees. You can list up to 50 items.

The MONTHLY Premium Plan is $9.95/month. You get unlimited listings and a lot more features than the FREE plan.

They YEARLY Premium Plan is $79.00.year. It saves you over 30% compared to paying the monthly fee.

4. Ave 21 – I have not used this website either. No listing fees. FREE to create your online store. You can add as many items as you want. They only charge a 3.5% commission on the sale price of each item you sell.

5. Handmade Catalog – Haven’t used this one.

UPDATE 07/18/13: HandmadeCatalog.com just changed their policy, they DO NOT charge any commissions or transaction fees any longer – only the monthly membership fees, you keep the rest. Their site has recently been renovated and is very easy to manage. And they do a lot of marketing for you!

Basic Membership: Pay only $4.95 per month or $40.00 per year. List up to 50 items to try out our services. HandmadeCatalog takes 15% commission from each item sold.

Standard Membership: $7.95 per month or $60.00 per year. List up to 250 items. HandmadeCatalog takes 10% commission from each item sold. List up to 3 items per year on the main page.

Professional Membership: $12.95 per month or $100 per year. Your Own Business Webpage Address, ie: www.handmadecatalog.com/mystore. Your Business Name on our List of Crafters. List up to 1200 items. HandmadeCatalog takes 5% commission from each item sold. List up to 5 items per year on the main page.

6. eBay – I sometimes sell on eBay but I do not use it to sell my handmade items. There are different options for selling on eBay.

Standard (no eBay store): No monthly/yearly fees. Up to 50 free listings per month. eBay takes 10% of every sale.

Basic Store: $19.95 per month or $15.95 per month with a yearly subscription. Up to 150 free listings per month. eBay takes a percentage of each sale based on the type of item you are selling.

Premium & Anchor Stores are only for those with a lot of inventory.

7. Meylah – I use Meylah to sell my digital crochet patterns. Meylah charges a 2.75% transaction fee on all sales that occur on your Meylah store. There are no listing or monthly fees.

8. Bonanza – I have never used. It is FREE to create a store and to list your items. Bonanza charges a 3.5% commission on each item that sells with a $0.50 minimum fee. If you sell an item over $500 they charge $17.50 + 1.5% of the amount over $500.

9. Made it Myself – I have not used this website to sell my items. There is no cost to open a shop. Since Made It Myself is still new and in Beta phase they are not charging listing fees at this time but I do not know when that will change. Regular listing fees are $0.05 for 30 days, $0.10 for 60 days and $0.20 for 120 days. They charge a 3% commission on every sale.

10. DaWanda – Setting up shop on DaWanda is FREE. It does not cost anything to list items on the English and French platforms. DaWanda only charges you a 5% commission fee on each successful sale you make through their website.

I would love to hear your thoughts if you have used these shops. If you know of an online marketplace that you can sell your handmade items that is not on this list please share it in the comments below so we can check it out. Thanks!

4 comments to 10 Websites where you can sell your Handmade Items

  • dianeevansislaseasyelegance

    So, actually, you have only used Etsy, then. I like the information you have given out- very informative, and I like the options, as well. Thank you–

    • The Steady Hand

      Yes to sell my physical handmade items I have only used Etsy. To sell my crochet patterns I use Etsy, Craftsy & Ravelry. I have tried selling my physical items on Meylah, TopHatter and other websites that I did not mention but they didn’t work out so I closed up shop on those websites. It is very hard to own multiple shops on different websites.

  • Pam Wylie

    HandmadeCatalog.com just changed their policy, they DO NOT charge any commissions or transaction fees any longer – only the monthly membership fees, you keep the rest. Their site has recently been renovated and is very easy to manage. And they do a lot of marketing for you!

I'd love to hear what you think!

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